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❶Their struggles in life are universal. William Shakespeare was great English playwright, dramatist and poet who lived during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.

William Shakespeare's Poetry




Shakespeare is writing at the end of a very long tradition of using lyric poems to examine the nature of human love, and there is a weight of insight as well as of rhetorical power behind his collection.

Nowhere in the Petrarchan tradition are the extremes of erotic revelation offered in such rawness and complexity. Most of the conventional topoi of traditional poetry are the starting points for the sonnets—the unity of lovers , the power of poetry to immortalize the beloved 18, 19, 55 , contests between eye and heart, beauty and virtue 46, , and shadow and substance 53, 98, To do so, however, would be to nullify their extraordinary power of creation, the way they force ejaculations of recognition, horror, or joy from their readers.

Unpredictability and change are at the heart of the sonnets—but it is a continually shifting heart, and one that conceives of human love as definable only in terms of such change and finitude. In Sonnet 60, for example, time is not an impartial or abstract background.

Even where it is glanced at as a pattern observable in nature or humanity, it is evoked as a disruptive, disturbing experience that cannot be dealt with as a philosophical problem. In Sonnet 15, it may be possible to enter into an understandable protest against time destroying its own creations a commonplace enough Renaissance sentiment , and to accede to a sense of helplessness before a malignant force greater than the individual human being. When the sonnet tries, however, by virtue of its formally structured argument, to create a consciousness that seeks to understand and so to control this awareness, the reader encounters lines or individual words that may undermine even the temporary satisfaction of the aesthetic form.

The sonnet does not and need not answer such questions. To attempt criticism of the sonnets is, to an unusual extent, to be challenged to make oneself vulnerable, to undergo a kind of creative therapy, as one goes back and forth from such textual gaps and indeterminacies to the shifting, vulnerable self, making the reader aware of the inadequacy and betrayal of words, as well as of their amazing seductiveness.

Consider, for example, Sonnet When one falls in love with a much younger person, does one inevitably feel the insecurity of a generation gap? What is more important in such a reading of the sonnets is the insistence that age or youthfulness are not important in themselves: It is the insistence itself that is important, not the mere fact of age—just as it is the anxiety with which a man or woman watches the wrinkles beneath the eyes that is important, not the wrinkles themselves.

It stands for an invitation to participate in some wider psychological revelation, to confess the vulnerability that people encounter in themselves in any relationship that is real and growing, and therefore necessarily unpredictable and risky.

Without vulnerability and contingency, without the sense of being thrown into the world, there can be no growth. Hence the poet invites the reader to accept ruefully what the fact of his age evokes—an openness to ridicule or rejection.

This is especially so in the Dark Lady sonnets, where there is a savage laceration of self, particularly in the fearful exhaustion of Sonnet , in which vulnerability is evoked as paralysis.

At once logically relentless and emotionally centrifugal, Sonnet generates fears or vulnerability and self-disgust. The strategies of the poem work to make the reader reveal or recognize his or her own compulsions and revulsions.

Even in the seemingly most serene sonnets, there are inevitably dark shadows of insecurity and anxiety. In Sonnet , for example, the argument is that a love that alters with time and circumstance is not a true, but a self-regarding love. The poem purports to define true love by negatives, but if those negatives are deliberately negated, the poem that emerges may be seen as the dark, repressed underside of the apparently unassailable affirmation of a mature, self-giving, other-directed love.

Such apparent affirmations may be acts of repression, an attempt to regiment the unrelenting unexpectedness and challenge of love. There are poems in the collection that, although less assertive, show a willingness to be vulnerable, to reevaluate constantly, to swear permanence within, not despite, transience—to be, in the words of Saint Paul, deceivers yet true. Elsewhere, part of the torture of the Dark Lady sonnets is that such a consolation does not emerge through the pain.

In short, what Sonnet represses is the acknowledgment that the only fulfillment worth having is one that is struggled for and that is independent of law or compulsion. The kind of creative fragility that it tries to marginalize is that evoked in the conclusion to Sonnet 49 when the poet admits his vulnerability: In the play Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare reveals a complex character, Juliet, who has a multifaceted personality. Even so, the essence of Juliet"s identify is her youth.

Her inexperience gives her a lovable freshness. This is first demonstrated in the famous balcony scene when she is talking to herself. Her question, What"s in a name? It"s her way of paraphrasing the question, Why? Children often ask this question without even thinking about it. As the scene progresses, she proposes to Romeo. She is so artless and untraditional in this regard.

Nowadays, society has given women more freedom and independence. Back then, a woman proposing marriage was unheard of. Through this encounter between Romeo and Juliet, we see I am going to prove that in the play Macbeth, a symbol of blood is portrayed oftenand with different meanings, and that it is a symbol that is developed until it is the dominating theme of the play towards the end of it. To begin with, I found the word blood, or different forms of it forty-two times ironically, the word fear is used forty-two times, with several other passages dealing with the symbol.

Perhaps the best way to show how the symbol of blood changes throughout the play, is to follow the character changes in Macbeth. First he is a brave honoured soldier, but as the play progresses, he becomes a treacherous person who has become identified with death and Othello is a classic tragic hero that stands out as distinguished individual failing in the encounter with evil.

Brought to us through Shakespeare's genius, he compares in significance to other personalities including Oedipus, Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet and other tragic heroes. This paper will focus on the explication of Othello as a tragic hero and his correspondence to the canons for tragic protagonists.

Othello and Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy To decide how well Othello fits into the mold of a tragic hero, one needs to accept in the first place a working definition of tragedy and tragic hero.

The theorists exploring tragedy almost universally draw upon the classic account of this play variety in Aristotle's Poetics. The prominent Greek philosopher defined I now claim the honor of being the first discoverer and announcer of the fact that in Hamlet can be found allusions and statements showing the most thorough and complete knowledge of the canon and statute law of England, relating to the burial of suicides that has ever been written.

He loosely based it on a historical event occurring around AD. Macbeth is the story of a nobleman, who, while trying to fulfill a prophecy told to him by three witches, murders his King to cause his ascension to the throne of Scotland. After the King's murder, Macbeth reigns as a cruel and ruthless tyrant, who is forced to kill more people to keep control of the throne. Finally, Scottish rebels combined with English forces attack Macbeth's castle, and Macbeth is killed by a Scottish Thane named Macduff who has sacrificed everything to see peace return to Scotland.

In the play, the word "blood" is mentioned numerous times. Warrior, gladiator, knight, or soldier, what ever you call it, they are the ones that do the dirty work in a certain society. A warrior is a defined as a man engaged in or experienced in warfare; one devoted to military life. You can say that Beowulf was a good warrior because, he was fearless, proud, well respected, and had a sense of duty to society.

Therefore both Beowulf and Macbeth, have characteristics of a good warrior. When Beowulf fought the dragon he was fearless, and even fought without Othello is one of Shakespeare"s darkest tragedies. It explores the issue of race, particularly in terms of the implications of interracial marriage.

Like any great work of art, Othello has many timeless qualities, but its treatment of the issue of race allows us to gain a perspective into Elizabethan attitudes. In addition, he is not a merely romantic figure; his own nature is romantic. He has not, indeed, the meditative or What is the truth in this respect will probably never be certainly known; but that he was more addicted to the employment of legal nomenclature than any English writer excepting, of course, the jurists is incontestable.

The work of winter evenings, commenced long ago, as an incident to habitual study of the works of him "who converted the elements which awaited at his command into entertainments," is submitted with little speculation upon questions concerning which there have been many words and few demonstrations. It is not pretended Shakespeares tragedy Macbeth contains an ellaborate exproation of the theme of kingship.

The main characters evil plan aims at overthrowing the current ruler and assuming power over Scotland. Based on this the playwright profoundly analyses which qualities are the most important in a king and the divine right of kings. Before carrying out his plot Macbeth weighed up all the reasons why he wanted to proceed with it and all the arguments against his terrible murder plan. One such argument is that this Duncan has been so clear in his great office.

Duncan is portrayed as a wise ruler who feels strongly abou the security of his country in the ongoing war with Norway. However, our encounter with this noble man When we leave Hamlet at the end of Act I we learn that he"s planning "to put an antic disposition on" - pretend to be mad.

However the events that follow in the posterior scene can lead the audience to question whether Hamlet"s "mad" behaviour is always a front. Are there times when it becomes a genuine part of his personality. Understanding Hamlet"s character throughout Act II is particularly difficult because we ourselves are in debate over the reality of Hamlet"s personality. So rather than increase our understanding of his character we can evaluate Hamlet"s apparent madness. Indeed there appear to be parts of the Act where Hamlet seems unable to control his behaviour and others where it is more obviously It was written by William Shakespeare for the King.

It is known as one of his 'greatest tragedies. It was seen as 'different' because women at that time were portrayed as 'weak' and 'feeble. The first time we see the strength in Lady Macbeth's character is in act 1, scene 5. She receives a letter Enter Barnardo and Francisco. Barnardo is the first to speak and he says, Who's there?

Francisco is reluctant to speak and insists that Barnardo makes himself known first. Francisco says, Nay, answer me. Stand and unfold yourself. There appears to be some hostility between the two since they don't exactly know whom they are speaking to. Barnardo then replies, Long live the King! William Shakespeare was great English playwright, dramatist and poet who lived during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.

Shakespeare is considered to be the greatest playwright of all time. William Shakespear e was born in Stratford in He was one of eight children. When William Shakespeare was about seven years old, he probably began attending the Stratford Grammar School with other boys of his social class. Students went to school year round attending school for nine hours a day. The teachers were strict disciplinarians. Stratford was an exciting place to live.


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One of William Shakespeare’s great advantages as a writer was that, as a dramatist working in the public theater, he was afforded a degree of autonomy from the cultural dominance of the court, his age’s most powerful institution.

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Essay on The Unaccounted for Period of William Shakespeare's Life - The Unaccounted for Period of William Shakespeare's Life William Shakespeare was born on April 26th [1] in Stratford on-Avon to parents John and Mary.

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William Shakespeare Essay Words | 5 Pages. William Shakespeare On April 26, , John Shakespeare's son, William, was baptized at the Stratford Parish Church. No one knows for certain when his birthday was. (Brown 22) It was thought that young Shakespeare began attending school at the age 7, in Stratford. Free william shakespeare papers, essays, and research papers.

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William Shakespeare was great English playwright, dramatist and poet who lived during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Shakespeare is considered to be the greatest playwright of all time. in William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare essays 0 Part One - Introduction to The Law in Shakespeare SHAKESPEARE"S persistent and correct use of law terms was long ago noticed and caused the conjecture that he must have studied in an attorney"s office.